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2006 Annual Report 




V 



EIERA 



Chairman's!, dter 




Dear Friends: 



In the past 20 years, the Authority has supported several innovative environmental programs that have 
been very beneficial to the state and its citizens. 

During the past year, the Authority has assisted the Kansas City Regional By-Products Synergy Project. 
This outstanding program was officially launched on July 20, 2004, by Bridging The Gap (BTG), a 
Kansas City-based community organization. 

The By-Product Synergy Project was established through the efforts of BTG's Environmental Excellence 
Business Network (EEBN) and the staff and resources of the Mid- America Regional Council (MARC), 
BNIM Architects, Franklin Associates and the U.S. Business Council for Sustainable Development. 

The purpose of the project is to form partnerships with Kansas City businesses that have raw materials 
on-site and other companies that can reuse that same raw material in its manufacturing process. These 
partnerships have saved Kansas City companies thousands of dollars in disposal fees and tons of raw 
materials are recovered rather than being trucked to a landfill. More than 20 Kansas City companies are 
members of the By-Products Synergy Group. 

This year, according to BTG officials, the project and its members will divert approximately 100 tons of 
material for re-processing. Next year, BTG projects that the figure could jump to 10,000 tons. Hopefully, 
in the near future, this project can be replicated in other communities across the state. 

Congratulations and continued success to Bridging The Gap, the By-Product Synergy Group and the 
Kansas City business community. 




Chairman 



Annual R eport 




Water Reclamation in Wentzville 




Diaper Dust Gets a Second Life 






Black Oak Composts Peas, Trees and Leaves 





College Gets Good Grades for Energy Efficiency 



Editorial Staff: 

Writing, editing and printing were coordinated by Kenneth Seeney, E IE RA. 

Photography: 

Photographs were provided by Kenneth Seeney, Missouri Environmental Improve- 
ment and Energy Resources Authority, J efferson City; Scott Myers, Missouri De- 
partment of Natural Resources, J efferson City; J im Gilstrap, Missouri Department 
of Natural Resources,] efferson City; Larry Archer, Missouri Department of Natural 
Resources, Jefferson City; Craig Post, Black Oak Organics, LLC, Verona; and 
Association of Missouri Electric Cooperatives, J efferson City. 

Front Cover: 

Next year, the city of Columbia will purchase wind energy from three wind turbines 
at this wind farm near King City, which is about 40 miles northeast of St. J oseph. 
The three turbines, which are as tall as a 21-story building, will generate an annual 
output to serve approximately 2,300 Columbia homes. Each blade on the turbine 
is 140 feet long, which is almost twice as long as a basketball court and nearly half 
the length of a football ffeld. 

Legal Counsel: 

Beverly Marcin 
Lewis, Rice & Fingersh 
500 N. Broadway, 
Suite 2000 
St. Louis, Missouri 63102 



IJsoyinkI This annual report is printed on recycled paper. ( 



Report Summary - 

1 Chairman's Letter 

2 Members of the Authority 

3 The E IE RA - Its History and Mission 

4 The Year in Review 

6 Down on the Farm - Fruit Loops, Chips and Pasta 

9 Missouri Market Development Program - Financial Summary 

11 Energy Loan Assistance - Project Summary 

12 SRF Projects Financed in Fiscal Year 2006 

13 Bond Financed Projects, 1973-2006 

17 Liberty Wastewater.. ..Goin' to Kansas City... 

18 Summary of Bond Issuances 

20 Brownffelds Program Generates Interest Across the State 

The 2006 Annual Report of the Environmental 
Improvement and Energy Resources Authority 
(EIERA), is a public record of the programs 
administered during ftcal year J uly 1, 2005 
through J une 30, 2006. 

EIERA 
Post Offte Box 744 
J efferson City, Missouri 65102 
(573) 751-4919 
Fax: (573)635-3486 
Web site: www.dnr.mo.gov/eiera 



M embers of the Authority 




William H. Worley, Chairman 



A Kansas City civic and business leader for more than 30 years, William Worley was appointed to the Authority for a three-year term by 
Gov. Bob Holden. 

Dr. Worley has a vast amount of experience in the environmental arena. In 1986, he founded Kingston Environmental Services, Inc. and 
currently serves as chairman of the board. Kingston is a full service environmental engineering, consulting and remediation firm based in 
Kansas City. Kingston offers environmental services throughout the United States. 

From 1992 to 1999, Worley was vice chairman of the Missouri Hazardous Waste Management Commission. Additionally, he has served 
on the boards of numerous civic, economic and cultural groups. In 1995, he received a Presidential Appointment to represent the state of 
Missouri at the White House Conference on Small Business. 

Dr. Worley was educated at the University of Missouri in Columbia receiving both a B.S. degree and a doctorate in Veterinary Medicine. 




Jerome (Jerry) Govero, Vice Chairman 



Jerry Govero was appointed to a two-year term by Gov. Bob Holden. He is a developer and engineer for Govero Land Services in Festus and has 
been involved in the planning and development of more than 10 residential communities. Also, he was a management consultant for Bloomsdale 
Excavating Company, Bloomsdale (Missouri), and worked as an engineer for Armour Agriculture Company in Crystal City. Govero served as a first 
lieutenant in the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers as a combat engineer. 

Govero, who earned a bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering from the University of Missouri, Rolla, is a member of the Missouri Society of 
Professional Engineers. He is a member of the Greater St. Louis Jaguar Association, the Festus Board of Appeals and Building Officials and Code 
Administrators (BOCA). He is the former president of the Parish Council of Our Lady Church, Festus, and served as board president of the PONY 
BIRD Home, Inc. Also, Govero is the former president of the Show Me Antique Car Club. 




Deron Cherry, Secretary-Treasurer 



Deron Cherry, reappointed to a second term by Gov. Matt Blunt, is a Kansas City businessman and former NFL star. Cherry is managing general 
partner of United Beverage Company, an Anheuser-Busch distributor in Kansas City. He is a minority owner for the NFL's Jacksonville Jaguars 
football team. 

A six-time All-Pro safety, Cherry was considered one of the best players in Kansas City Chiefs history. He was named to the All NFL Decade Team 
in the 1980s and is a member of the Kansas City Chiefs Hall of Fame. Known for his bone-jarring tackles, his 50 career interceptions rank third 
in club history. In 1988, he received the NFL Players Association's highest honor, The Byron White Humanitarian Award for service to his team, 
community and country. 

Cherry, who graduated from Rutgers University with a B.S. degree in Biology, has been a spokesman and fundraiser for several non-profit 
organizations. He is the founder of Score 1 for Health, a program that provides health screenings for more than 12,000 children in the Kansas City 
metropolitan area. Also, he is co-chairman of the Jazz District Redevelopment Corporation and serves on the Kansas City Sports Commission and 
the Kansas City Liquor Advisory Committee. Recently, he was selected by Gov. Blunt to serve on the Jackson County Sports Authority. 




Darwin Hindman, Member 



Gov. Bob Holden appointed Darwin Hindman to a two-year term on the Authority. In 1995, Hindman was elected mayor of Columbia and 
is serving his fifth term. Also, Hindman practices law at the Columbia firm of Hindman and Goldstein, LLC. 

Very active in the community, Hindman is president of the Missouri Rails to Trails Foundation and is a former member of the Missouri 
Economic Development Finance Board and the Missouri State Parks Advisory Board. 

Mayor Hindman earned his bachelor and law degrees from the University of Missouri, Columbia, and served two tours of active duty as an 
Air Force pilot. He has been honored on numerous occasions including the Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Memorial Association Award, Citizen 
of the Year citation by the Columbia Chamber of Commerce, and Chevron-Times Mirror Publication's Citizen Conservation Award. 




Ryan Doyle, P.E., Member 



Ryan Doyle was appointed to the Authority for a three-year term by Gov. Matt Blunt. He is currently a safety engineer at ATK at the 
Lake City Ammunition Plant. 

Prior to joining ATK, Doyle was an environmental and safety engineer for three years at Pittsburgh Corning in Sedalia. Also, he served one 
year as a field engineer at Schlumberger Oil Field Services in Abilene, Texas. In 2000, Doyle was an engineer associate (intern) at Black & 
Veatch's Water Division in Kansas City. 

In 2001, Doyle earned a B.S. degree in Chemical Engineering from the University of Kansas and is a certified Professional Engineer. He 
is married and lives in Lee's Summit. 



A nnual R eport 



LlbhA 



TheEl ER A - ItsH istory and M ission 




The Environmental Improvement and Energy 
Resources Authority (EIERA) is an independent, 
self-supporting agency, created in 1972 by the 
state legislature. The EIERA's mandate is to 
protect Missouri's environment, develop energy 
alternatives, and promote economic development. 
The Authority's mandate is broad and includes 
financing projects and providing technical 
assistance. 

The EIERA is not a regulatory agency. The 
Authority operates as a quasi-governmental agency 
and receives no state general revenues or federal 
funds for its operation. The agency operates on 
fees received for issuing bonds. However, in 1972, 
the EIERA did receive a one-time appropriation 
of $225,000 from the General Assembly. Over the 
years, these monies have been leveraged into 
$4.8 billion for environmental financing. 




This 3,000-foot runway, taxi area and parking apron at the Rolla Downtown 
Airport were paved with 4,000 tons of Glasphalt, a mixture that included 
asphalt and 400 tons of recycled glass. In 1997, the airport, which is the first 
aviation facility in the United States to use Glasphalt, received $150,000 in 
assistance from EIERA's Market Development Program. 



The governor appoints the five members of the 
Authority's board for three-year terms. Board members 
have experience in law, finance, and environmental 
affairs. A director and seven staff members conduct the 
day-to-day activities. 

Since 1973, the EIERA has been recognized as an 
extremely important financing agency. The EIERA 
issues several types of traditional tax exempt and taxable 
notes and bonds which are regulated by state and federal 
laws. The structure of EIERA financings and assistance 
have varied greatly and are dependent upon the uses and 
repayment sources of the projects. The nature and size 
of the projects as well as current federal and state laws 
are also factors, which must be considered by the EIERA 
board and staff when requests for financing are reviewed. 

In addition to bond issues and other financings, 
the EIERA can provide small projects with financial 
assistance, too. The EIERA continues to develop 
alternative financing methods to assist environmental 
improvement and energy projects. In terms of energy 
projects, the Missouri Energy Efficiency Leveraged Loan 
Program is regarded as the first of its type in the nation. 
Developed in 2000 by EIERA staff and the Department 
of Natural Resources' Energy Center, this program 



provides low-cost financing to increase energy 
efficiency in Missouri schools and public buildings. 

In 1990, the State Revolving Fund (SRF) was 
developed by EIERA, the Clean Water Commission, 
Department of Natural Resources and the U.S. 
Environmental Protection Agency. One of the highest 
rated SRFs in the nation, this program provides 
low-cost loans to communities and districts for 
construction of wastewater and sewage treatment 
plants. In 1997, a drinking water SRF was developed 
to assist communities in their efforts to upgrade public 
drinking water systems and facilities. Also, with this 
expansion, the Safe Drinking Water Commission is 
now a partner in the SRF. 

In 1992, the Missouri General Assembly 
established the Missouri Market Development 
Program to develop and promote markets for recycled 
content products. The EIERA administers the 
program and receives assistance through an inter- 
agency steering committee composed of staff at the 
Department of Natural Resources and the Department 
of Economic Development. The steering committee 
reviews applications and the Authority's board of 
directors approves all projects. 



Annual R eport 




Last year, the Authority developed the revolving loan 
fund for Brownfields projects. This low-cost loan program 
has generated tremendous interest across the state and 
empowered community leaders, business owners and 
company officials to transform blighted and abandoned 
properties into developments that create jobs and increase 
property values. This is a major project that will enhance 
the state on an economic as well as environmental level. 

In 2006, the Authority issued more than $172 million in 
State Revolving Fund bonds for wastewater and drinking 
water projects. The Market Development Program, which 
promotes markets for recycled-content products, provided 
$380,000 in project assistance and more than $70,000 
in technical assistance. The Missouri Energy Efficiency 
Leveraged Loan Program awarded $13 million in low- 
cost loans to 25 public school projects and seven local 
government projects received assistance totaling 
$1.7 million for energy efficiency improvements. 

Staff Activities 

The EIERA staff provides support to other organizations 
that promote environmental protection or environmental 
financing initiatives. 

Council of Infrastructure Financing Authorities 

Based in Washington, D.C., the Council of Instructure 
Financing Authorities (CIFA) was established in 
the mid-1980s. CIFA has members in 44 states 
and is administered by an executive director 
and four officers (president, vice president, 
secretary and treasurer). The EIERA is a charter 
member of CIFA and Tom Welch, director, and 
Karen Massey, deputy director, are the EIERA 
representatives. 

CIFA is a major voice in advancing 
innovative debt financing techniques to ensure 
public access to affordable infrastructure 
improvements. It harnesses the resources of 
federal, state and local governments to serve the 
environmental needs of the general public. 



MORA goals support waste reduction and recycling by 
providing information, educational opportunities and 
technical assistance. The 200-member organization 
sponsors an annual conference and supports other 
environmental conferences and seminars. The group 
publishes a quarterly newsletter and is an affiliate of the 
National Recycling Coalition. 

Missouri Waste Control Coalition 

The Missouri Waste Control Coalition (MWCC) is 
300-member not-for-profit organization. The statewide 
organization is a coalition of citizens, companies and 
organizations who are concerned about the environment 
and the proper management and disposal of generated 
wastes. 

Annually, the MWCC sponsors the Missouri Waste 
Management Conference, a conference that has run 
continuously since 1972, making it one of the oldest 
environmental conferences in the nation. Also, the 
MWCC publishes three newsletters per year and annually 
sponsors an awards program, teacher grant program, and 
an environmental greeting card competition for middle 
school children. Staff member Kenneth Seeney is a 
former president of the MWCC and currently serves 
on the advisory board and is public relations chairman. 
Kristin Allan Tipton is president of the coalition. 



Missouri Recycling Association 

The Missouri Recycling Association 
(MORA) is a statewide not-for-profit 
organization that is administered by a 
12-member board. Staff member Kristin Allan 
Tipton is a past president of MORA. 




Since 1972, the Authority has issued bonds totaling more than $4.8 billion for 
environmental and infrastructure improvements, which includes the construction 
of wastewater treatment and public drinking water facilities. The facility pictured 
here is the Branson wastewater plant, which processes 5.3 million gallons a day. 



Annual R eport 



State R 8/olving F und 



Water Reclamation in Wentzville 



Local farmers are very happy when a truck from the 
Wentzville Water Reclamation Center pulls up to their gate. 
Each year, the operations staff from the Wentzville Water 
Reclamation Center truck 320 tons of wastewater 
bio-solids - nutrient-rich bio-solids out to their fields. 

This past year, city officials received a $19.4 million 
loan from the State Revolving Fund (SRF) to implement 
improvements to the Wentzville Water Reclamation Center. 
The plant, which has five full-time employees, is located on 
a 54-acre tract along McCoy Creek, which is just off Mette 
Road. 

Goodwin Brothers Construction Company, Crystal 
City, was the contractor for the project. With 37 workers 
at the site, the company began construction on March 20, 
2006, and expects to finish the project by December 2007. 
In addition to other construction at the site, the company 
built four structures - the three-story headworks building, 
electrical works unit, blower building, and ultra violent (UV) 
building. 



"Whether it's our homeowners or existing businesses 
or new industry, we want to provide high-quality service, 
at the lowest cost, without system overloads," Lambi 
stated. 

Since 1990, Missouri's State Revolving Fund has 
awarded more than $1.7 billion in low-cost loans to 
communities and districts across the state. This past 
year, 19 communities received assistance totaling 
$140.9 million for wastewater improvements. Also, seven 
communities and districts received $31.8 million for the 
construction of public drinking water facilities. 

EIERA Board member Darwin Hindman said the plant 
is an award- winning facility in a growing community. 
"A couple of years ago, Wentzville received an award 
from the Missouri Water Environment Association for 
wastewater management. Also, General Motors built a 
plant there (in 1999), so this facility has upgraded its 
equipment to meet the increasing demands on the system 
and still protect the environment." 



In the state-of-the-art UV building, 
plant effluent is exposed to ultra 
violent light to kill microorganisms 
rather than using the traditional 
method (chlorine) prior to entering the 
receiving stream. This fish- friendly 
method does not remove oxygen from 
the receiving stream. With all the 
improvements and a fourth treatment 
basin, the facility will be able to 
process more than five million gallons 
of wastewater per day. 

Mayor Paul Lambi emphasized 
that by utilizing the SRF rather than 
conventional financing, the city will 
realize annual savings of $471,000. 
Also, the plant improvements were 
necessary to meet the growing 
demands of residential and industrial 
development. Wentzville, which is 
located 40 miles west of St. Louis, 
has a population of 22,000 people. 




When completed, the UV (ultra violent-light) Building will be one part of a large improvement 
project at the Wentzville wastewater treatment plant, supported by a $19.4 million loan through 
the State Revolving Fund (SRF). City leaders stated by using the SRF they will realize an an- 
nual savings of $471,000. 



Annual R eport 




Diaper Dust Gets a Second Life 



There is a lot of Luv at this manufacturing plant, 
five miles north of Cape Girardeau. 

There is a lot of Luv. . .and Pampers and other 
paper products. Each month, thousands of diapers are 
produced at Procter & Gamble's 80-acre plant, which is 
a mile north of Trail of Tears State Park and about 100 
miles south of St. Louis. The company employs 1,300 
workers and its annual payroll of $89 million makes 
Procter & Gamble the largest employer in southeast 
Missouri. 

However, the production of disposable diapers was 
creating 180 tons of diaper dust every month, which 
was being trucked to a local landfill. Every year, 
disposal costs were about $150,000. 

In 2001, Procter & Gamble received $50,000 in 
assistance from the Missouri Market Development 
Program in Jefferson City. Company officials used the 
funds to purchase a baler and other equipment. The 
company's vacuum system sucks diaper dust and paper 
fibers from the assembly lines and sends it to a machine 
that feeds the dust into the baler. 

Each hour, the blue baler produces a three-foot, 
white "square" that weighs 600 pounds. The bales are 
shipped to companies throughout the Midwest that re- 
use the paper fibers in their manufacturing operations. 
One company re-uses the diaper dust in a metal refining 
process. 

This recycling effort has been very beneficial 
to Procter & Gamble. "Since fiscal year 2004, we 
diverted 4,500 tons from local landfills," said Richard 
McLeod, plant manager. "Additionally, we have saved 
more than $300,000 in landfill fees during that period." 

Also, Procter & Gamble has recycling programs that 
include office paper and aluminum cans. "About 89 
percent of all waste at this plant is recycled," McLeod 
said. 

"These are the kinds of projects that are good for a 
community," said William Worley, EIERA chairman. 



"The company is helping to protect the environment 
through waste diversion and also creating a second life 
for a valuable raw material." 

Worley added that the state wants to see companies 
like Procter & Gamble succeed because they are 
important to the region's economic fabric. "This 
company provides jobs for 1,300 people - people who 
will buy butter and bread and put gasoline in their cars 
and that supports the local economy." 




with financial assistance from the Market Development Program. 
Every hour, the baler produces one three-foot bale of diaper dust 
that weighs 600 pounds. Later it is shipped to another company 
for reuse in a manufacturing process. 



Annual R eport 



□ERA 




Down on the Farm - Fruit Loops, Chips and Pasta 



On U.S. 63, near Houston (Missouri), there is a road 
sign that says a community called "Success" is 16 miles 
to the west on Highway 17. But a real success story is 
located a few miles down the road on a 380-acre farm. 

Fruit Loops, red and green ice cream sprinkles, 
curly pasta and potato chips are welcomed at the front 
door. "We take all of it," said Lexie Grisham, president 
of Grisham Farm Products, Inc., referring to the food 
wastes he uses in the production of a commercial animal 
feed. The company, which employs 68 workers at this 
four-building plant, is two miles west of Mountain 
Grove. Also, he has 600 beef cattle and 1,500 hogs. 

Grisham and his son Rick (vice president) have 
32 trucks on the road that collect dry and wet food 
wastes from stores, restaurants and wholesale outlets in 
Alabama, Arkansas, Tennessee and other nearby states. 
"My gasoline (diesel) bill is $90,000 every two weeks," 
Grisham explained. 

At the plant, the dry animal feed is produced using 
a heating process that reaches 500 degrees and the raw 
materials are funneled through a 
large rotating cylinder. Then the 
animal feed is poured into 25- 
ton trucks and shipped to Tyson 
Foods, the primary customer. 
Each month, Grishman Farms 
produces 1 1 million pounds of 
animal feed. 



In fiscal year 2005, Grisham 
Farms received $46,275 in 
financial assistance from the 
Missouri Market Development 
Program. Company officials 
purchased two yellow mixers that 
receive and stir raw materials 
before the drying process. The 
mixers, which are about eight- 
feet tall, hold 1 1 ,000 pounds and 
process 50,000 pounds of raw 
materials every hour. 



Annually, Grisham's operation diverts more 
than 135 million pounds of raw materials from area 
landfills. "That's a phenomenal diversion rate," said 
Deron Cherry, the Authority's secretary-treasurer. 
"And that's the purpose of the market development 
program - diverting waste from the state's landfills 
and creating products for the marketplace that have 
recycled content." 

In FY 2006, the Market Development Program 
provided assistance to 10 Missouri businesses totaling 
$430,200. Also, 16 companies and organizations 
received technical assistance totaling $70,275. During 
the past 1 5 years, the program has provided $7 million 
to 250 Missouri businesses across the state to support 
recycled product development. 

In 1991, the Market Development Program was 
established by the General Assembly in an effort to 
conserve landfill space and to encourage economic 
development initiatives that would energize the 
recycling industry. Missouri was one of the first states 
in the nation to operate an assistance program to create 
recycled content products for the marketplace. 




These two mixers at the Grisham Farms were purchased with assistance from the Market 
Development Program. The mixers, which are about eight-feet tall, hold 11,000 pounds and can 
process 50,000 pounds of raw materials every hour. 



Annual R eport 




Black Oak Composts Peas, Trees and Leaves 



"You don't see many companies doing that," said 
Craig Post, president of Black Oak Organics, LLC, 
formerly known as CHP Environmental. "We're one 
of the few companies in Missouri that composts food 
wastes." 

Based in Verona, Black Oak Organics is 23 miles 
west of Springfield. Depending on the market demand, 
the company contracts with a hauling firm and collects 
food wastes, commercial wood wastes, yard wastes, tree 
wastes and storm debris to process into a rich compost 
material. The food wastes and other raw materials 
are collected from restaurants, stores, tree-trimming 
companies, construction companies and utilities in the 
Springfield area. In the near future, the company will 
collect from schools and colleges. 

Black Oak, which has five employees, is just 18 
months old. Annually, Post 
estimates that the company 
will divert 10,000 tons of 
valuable raw materials from 
area landfills. 

In FY 2006, Post 
received $50,000 in 
financial assistance from 
the Missouri Market 
Development Program to 
purchase a windrow turner. 
The windrow turner grinds, 
chops and shapes windrows 
that are 14 feet wide and 
about eight feet tall. The 
woodrow turner is operated 
by one person and travels 
about a quarter of mile in an 
hour. 



"We ship our compost to lawn and garden companies, 
nurseries and construction companies throughout 
southwest Missouri," Post confirmed. On an annual 
basis, Black Oak produces 18,000 cubic yards of 
compost (approximately 6,700 tons). 

EIERA vice chairman Jerry Govero said that 
compost projects are important in the overall 
scheme of waste management. "In addition to 
taking up about seven to 10 percent of the capacity," 
Govero said, "Food wastes are 90 percent water, 
which in itself can cause numerous problems in the 
management of a landfill." 

For more information or to obtain a project 
application, please call the Market Development 
Program at EIERA in Jefferson City at (573) 526-5555. 



When the raw materials 
become compost, which is 
usually a 15-week cycle, the 
new product is packed and 
ready for market. 




At Black Oak Organics in Verona, this $95,000 windrow turner grinds, chops and shapes windrows 
that are 14 feet wide and about eight feet tall. The windrow turner, which weighs 36,000 pounds 
and is about 12 feet tall, can cover a quarter of mile in an hour. 



Annual R eport 



EEtA 



M issouri M arkdt D e/dopment P rogram 



Financial Assistance Projects 






Fiscal Year 2006 






Company 


Materials 


Location 


Amount 


EPC, Inc. 


Electronic Scrap 


St. Charles 


$34 800 00 


Black Oak Organics, LLC. 


Food, Yard Waste 


Springfield 


$50 000 00 


Loganbill Enterprises, Inc. Food, Yard Waste, Manure 


Latham 


$50,000.00 


Strategic Materials, Inc. 


Glass 


St. Louis 


$50,000.00 


International Mulch Company, Inc. 


Shredded Truck Tires 


St. Louis 


$40,000.00 


Missouri Botanical Gardens 


Plastic 


St. Louis 


$5,400.00 


DoCo, Inc. 


Wood Waste 


Ava 


$50,000.00 


Recycling Concepts, Inc. 


Plastic 


St. Louis 


$50,000.00 


Nike IHM Polyether Urethane Plastics 


St. Charles 


$50,000.00 






Total $380,200.00 


Technical Assistance Projects 






Fiscal Year 2006 






Company 


Materials 


Location 


Amount 


In-Sight Color Coded Recycling System 


Plastic 


Fenton 


$5,000.00 


Coon Manufacturing 


Plastic, Styrene 


Spickard 


$4,000.00 


Bay Creek 


Fabric Waste 


Mountain View 


$4,000.00 


Terrene 


Food Waste Compost 


St. Louis 


$5,590.00 


Rustique Enterprises, Inc. 


PVC, Polystyrene Foam 


St. Charles 


$3,500.00 


Integrity Recyclers, LLC 


Carpet Waste 


St. Louis 


$6,000.00 


Reglass, LLC 


Glass 


St. Joseph 


$4,810.00 


DoCo, Inc. 


Wood Waste 


Ava 


$5,550.00 


Award Source 


Wood Waste 


St. James 


$4,000.00 


Hammons Products Company 


Black Walnut Waste 


Stockton 


$4,000.00 


Delta Fibers, LLC 


Cotton Gin Waste 


Caruthersville 


$3,125.00 


Research - Used Mattresses Recycling 


Mattresses 


Statewide 


$5,000.00 


Hogenmiller Appliances & Electronics 


E-Waste 


Barnhart 


$4,200.00 


Macon Diversified Industries 


Textiles 


Macon 


$3,000.00 


MarChem Coated Fabrics, Inc. 


Textiles 


New Haven 


$4,500.00 


Premium Standard Farms 


Wood Waste chips 


Milan 


$5,000.00 






'Total $37,748.00 



□ERA 



A nnual R eport 




College Gets Good Grades for Energy Efficiency 

At 6'7" and 230 pounds, forward Darryl Butterfield has a chilling effect on opposing basketball teams. What's 
even more chilling are the new air conditioning units at his former college, Mineral Area College. 

Mineral Area College in Park Hills, which is about 80 miles southwest of St. Louis, received financial assistance 
totaling $1.1 million from the Missouri Energy Efficiency Leveraged Loan Program. The loan program was 
developed in 2000 by the EIERA in partnership with the Department of Natural Resources (DNR). The loan is 
financing that provides a low interest rate and replaces a construction loan that originated in 2003 between the 
college and DNR's Energy Center. 

In addition to the nine air conditioning units and a 14-foot cooling tower, the St. Louis-based Trane Company and 
five technicians installed 2,183 energy-efficient light fixtures in seven campus buildings - the C.H. Cozean Library, 
Arts and Science Building, bookstore, Fine Arts Building, North College Center, Public Safety, and Robert Sechrest 
Fieldhouse. 

Annually, based on the energy improvements and projections by Trane, the college will save 1 million kilowatts 
of energy and $96,190. "All Missouri colleges, both private and public institutions, are operating on tight budgets," 
said Steven Kurtz, president of the college. "Anytime you can save money and resources and improve the classroom 
environment, that's a positive goal in terms of our expectations." 



Kurtz notes that the attractive 
waterfall in front of the Sechrest 
Fieldhouse was constructed by 
three workmen from Brookside 
Contracting in DeSoto. 
Workmen trucked 150 tons of 
rock from a ravine on the west 
side of the 300-acre campus. 

The state loan program 
provides low-cost loan 
assistance to local officials and 
school districts. The purpose 
is to encourage the installation 
of energy-efficient lights, 
streetlights and other energy 
conservation equipment for 
schools and public buildings. 

"This program has been 
very beneficial for local 
governments," said Ryan Doyle, 
EIERA board member. "We 
have been told on a number 
of occasions that without state 





This 14-foot cooling tower, which weights more than 11,000 pounds and pumps 1,050 gallons 
of water per minute, was purchased with a $1.1 million loan from Missouri Energy Efficiency 
Leveraged Loan Fund. With several other energy improvements, school officials at Mineral Area 
College will save more than $96,000 annually. 



Annual R eport 



EIERA 



E nergy L oan P rogram 




Through participation in a state energy loan program, 
officials at Mineral Area College were able to install nine air 
conditioning units and 2,183 energy-efficient lights in seven 
buildings on the 300-acre campus. 



assistance the energy improvements would not have 
even been considered." 

Nationally, Missouri is the first state to administer 
this type of loan program. During fiscal year 2006, 
32 projects across the state were financed for a total of 
$14.8 million. 

Also, the EIERA bonds, which are issued to provide 
the loans, have $6.8 million in reserve as security 
against any potential deficient loan payments. The 
participants will repay the loans in specified payments 
not to exceed a 16-year period. Historically, the loan 
program has held an Aa2 rating, which is one of the 
highest ratings available. Moody's Investor Service, 
a ratings firm based in New York, assigned the rating. 
The ratings reflect the size, security and quality of the 
loan program and the high quality of EIERA-issued 
bonds in the financial market. 

To obtain more information about the Missouri 
Energy Efficiency Leveraged Loan Program contact the 
Energy Center at (573) 751-7466. 



Project Summary - Fisca 


1 Year 2006 


Local Government Projects 


Participant 


Amount 


Belton 


$ 86,157.20 


Grundy County 


$ 39,090.00 


Liberty 


$ 114,657.46 


Osage County 


$ 3,696.53 


Ozark County 


$ 60,042.84 


St. Louis 


$ 781,628.43 


St. Louis Community College 


$610,318.63 


Total 


$1,695,591.09 


Public School Projects 


Participant 


Amount 


Ava R-l School District 


$ 964,315.98 


Cape Girardeau 63 School District 


$ 224,087.64 


Climax Springs R-IV 


$ 46,250.93 


Eminence R-l 


$ 87,134.63 


Fair Play R-l 1 


$219,832.69 


Golden City R-l 11 


$ 63,643.14 


Hancock Place School District 


$ 197,111.60 


Hardin Central C-2 School District 


$ 183,322.61 


Hartville R-ll 


$ 194,148.60 


HolcombR-111 


$ 140,776.93 


Humansville R-IV 


$ 49,284.32 


Kirbyville R-VI 


$ 23,842.84 


Lee's Summit R-VII 


$2,118,723.12 


Liberal R-ll 


$ 117,094.14 


Logan-Rogesville R-VIII 


$ 185,098.97 


Macks Creek R-V 


$ 49,704.39 


Mehlville R-IX 


$ 355,363.24 


New Franklin R-l 


$231,318.77 


Newburg R-ll 


$241,036.94 


Norborne R-VIII 


$ 54,671.47 


Richmond R-XVI 


$ 286,802.47 


Sedalia 200 School District 


$ 2,225,564.58 


Twin Rivers R-X 


$ 111,216.87 


University City School District 


$4,404,643.03 


Warsaw R-IX 


$ 312,558.20 


Total 


$13,087,547.23 



A nnual R eport 



P rojectsF inanced in F iscal Y ear 2006 



State Revolving Fund 

Clean Water Projects 



Participant 


Amount 


Arnold 


$6,125,000 


Arnold 


$2,875,000 


Battlefield 


$850,000 




$4 600 000 


Herculaneum 


$6,000,000 


Indian Point 


$795,000 


Jefferson City 


$10,105,000 


Kirksville 


$1,595,000 


Liberty 


$6,180,000 


Metropolitan Sewer District, St. Louis 


$42,715,000 


Moberly 


$5,460,000 


Newburg 


$250,000 


Osage Beach 


$4,950,000 


Ozark 


$7,980,000 


Platte County Regional Sewer District 


$11,910,000 


Raytown 


$7,590,000 


Seneca 


$765,000 


Wardsville 


$760,000 


Wentzville 


$19,430,000 


Total 8140,935,000 


Drinking Water Projects 


Participant 


Amount 


Cape Girardeau County PWS District #1 


$600,000 


Clarence Cannon Wholesale Water Commission 


$9,700,000 


Clarence Cannon Wholesale Water Commission $590,000 


Kirksville 


$1,805,000 


Russelville 


$650,000 


Shelby County PWS District #4 


$810,000 


Tri-County Water Authority (Independence) 


$17,625,000 


Total 


$31,780,000 




A popular haven for trout fishing, Bennett Springs is 
situated in a 3,100-acre state park about 12 miles west of 
Lebanon. Daily, more than 100 million gallons of water 
gush from Missouri's third largest spring. 



Annual R eport 



P rojectsF inanced T hrough B ond I sguancs 



3973-2006 





Project 


Location 




Amount Financed 


1973 


St. Joe Minerals Corporation 


Herculaneum 




$ 


7,000,000 








TOTAL: 


$ 


7,000,000 


1974 


Union Electric Company 


St. Louis 




$ 


16,500,000 








TOTAL: 


$ 


16,500,000 


1975 


Mobay Chemical Corporation 


Kansas City 




$ 


7,500,000 




Alpha Portland Industries, Inc. 


St. Louis 




$ 


1 ,900,000 




Union Electric Company 


St. Louis 




$ 


22,000,000 




Mobay Chemical Corporation 


Kansas City 




$ 


3,500,000 




Amco Corporation 


Kansas City 




$ 


123,350,000 








TOTAL: 


$ 


158,250,000 


1976 


Noranda Aluminum Company 


New Madrid 




$ 


10,500,000 




American Cyanamid Company 


Hannibal 




$ 


9,120,000 








TOTAL: 


$ 


19,620,000 


1977 


Standard Oil (AMOCO) Company 


Kansas City 




$ 


6,450,000 




Great Lakes Carbon Corporation 


St. Louis 




$ 


7,000,000 




Kansas City Power & Light Company 


Kansas City 




$ 


20,000,000 




Union Electric Company 


St. Louis 




$ 


27,085,000 








TOTAL: 


$ 


60,535,000 


1978 


Mobay Chemical Corporation 


Kansas City 




$ 


1 1 ,000,000 




Mobay Chemical Corporation 


Kansas City 




$ 


825,000 




Kansas City Power & Light 


Kansas City 




$ 


31,000,000 




Gulf - Western Industries, Inc. 


Cape Girardeau 




$ 


1 1 ,000,000 




Monsanto Company 


St. Louis 




$ 


2,370,000 




Empire District Electric Company 


Kansas City 




$ 


8,000,000 








TOTAL: 


$ 


64,195,000 


1979 


Monsanto Company 


St. Louis 




$ 


10,250,000 




Mobay Chemical Company 


Kansas City 




$ 


1 1 ,000,000 




American Cyanamid 


Hannibal 




$ 


3,700,000 




Monsanto Company (Queeny Plant) 


St. Louis 




$ 


2,900,000 








TOTAL: 


$ 


27,850,000 


1980 


Associated Electric Cooperative, Inc. 


Thomas Hill 




$ 


95,000,000 




Alpha Portland Industries, Inc. 


St. Louis 




$ 


1,450,000 




River Cement Company 


Festus 




$ 


5,700,000 




Standard Oil (AMOCO) Company 


Kansas City 




$ 


8,300,000 




Great Lakes Container Corporation 


St. Louis 




$ 


800,000 




Union Electric Company 


St. Louis 




$ 


60,000,000 




American Cyanamid Company 


Hannibal 




$ 


3,450,000 




St. Joseph Light & Power Company 


St. Joseph 




$ 


5,300,000 








TOTAL: 


$ 


180,000,000 


1981 


Associated Electric Cooperative, Inc. 


New Madrid 




$ 


36,000,000 




City of Wentzville (GM Plant) 


Wentzville 




$ 


6,350,000 




Union Electric Company 


St. Louis 




$ 


45,000,000 








TOTAL: 


$ 


87,350,000 



EIERA 



A nnual R eport 





Project 


Location 


Amount Financed 


1982 


Associated Electric Cooperative, Inc. 


Thomas Hill 


$ 


—7 H AAA AArt 

71,000,000 




Associated Electric Cooperative, Inc. 


Thomas Hill 


$ 


50,000,000 




Associated Electric Cooperative, Inc. 


Thomas Hill 


$ 


73,000,000 




Associated Electric Cooperative, Inc. 


Thomas Hill 


$ 


12,000,000 




Noranda Aluminum, Inc. 


New Madrid 




a a Ann nnn 




Union Electric Company 


St. Louis 


<t 


^U,UUU,UUU 




Monsanto Company 


St. Louis 


$ 


r\ oOtT AAA 

9,325,000 




Associated Electric Cooperative, Inc. 


Thomas Hill 


$ 


r- r- AAA AAA 

55,900,000 




Grant Anticipation Notes, 1982 


various locations 


$ 


24,500,000 






TOTAL: 


$ 


360,725,000 


1983 


St. Joseph Light & Power Company 


Kansas City 


$ 


r— AAA AAA 

5,600,000 




Community Development Program, 1983 


various municipalities 


$ 


-4 AAA AAA 

18,000,000 




Grant Anticipation Notes, 1983 


various municipalities 


$ 


AAA AA AAA 

44,100,000 




Associated Electric Cooperative, Inc. 


New Madrid 


$ 


AAA AA AAA 

44,100,000 






TOTAL: 


$ 


111,800,000 


1984 


Union Electric Company 


St. Louis 


$ 


A A AAA AAA 

160,000,000 




Lone Star Industries, Inc. 


Cape Girardeau 




a a a a nnn 

y, 1 uu,uuu 




Monsanto Company 


St. Louis 


$ 


A O A A AAA 

2,890,000 




Union Electric Company 


St. Louis 


$ 


A ~7 CAA AAA 

47,500,000 




Associated Electric Cooperative, Inc. 


Thomas Hill 


$ 


A CO A AC AAA 

153,125,000 






TOTAL: 


$ 


«7A A A C AAA 

372,615,000 


1985 


Union Electric Company 


St. Louis 


$ 


126,500,000 




Community Development Program, 1985 


various municipalities 


$ 


A C" AAA AAA 

15,000,000 




Grant Anticipation Notes, 1985 


various municipalities 


$ 


90,000,000 




Chrysler Corporation 


St. Louis 


$ 


16,000,000 




Mobay Chemical Corporation 


Kansas City 


$ 


A AAA AAA 

1 ,600,000 




Reynolds Metal Company 


Kansas City 


$ 


— 7 r - A AAA 

750,000 






TOTAL: 


$ 


249,850,000 


1986 


Grant Anticipation Notes, 1986 


various municipalities 


$ 


AC AAA AAA 

65,000,000 






TOTAL: 




fiC AAA AAA 

65,000,000 


1988 


Community Development Note Program, 1988 


various municipalities 


$ 


15,000,000 




Monsanto Company 


St. Louis 


$ 


—j nr a aaa 

7,850,000 






TOTAL: 


$ 


22,850,000 


1989 


Grant Anticipation Notes, 1989 


various municipalities 


$ 


H vt OCA AAA 

14,850,000 




St. Joseph Light & Power Company 


St. Joseph 


$ 


C AAA AAA 

5,600,000 






TOTAL: 


$ 


A A A CO AAA 

20,450,000 


1990 


Union Electric Company 


St. Louis 


$ 


A A AAA AAA 

60,000,000 






TOTAL: 


$ 


A A AAA AAA 

60,000,000 


1991 


City of Springfield 


Springfield 


$ 


32,650,000 




City of Lee's Summit 


Lee's Summit 


$ 


9,695,000 




Noranda Aluminum, Inc. 


New Madrid 


$ 


45,000,000 




Metropolitan Sewer District 


St. Louis 


$ 


68,000,000 




St. Louis County Water Company 


St. Louis 


$ 


25,000,000 




Missouri Cities Water Company 


various locations 


$ 


4,500,000 






TOTAL: 


$ 


184,845,000 



A nnual R eport 



□ERA 



Project 



Location 



Amount Financed 



1992 


Union Electric Company 


St. Louis 




$ 


42,685,000 




State Revolving Fund 


various locations 




$ 


13,550,000 




State Revolving Fund, MSD 


St. Louis 




$ 


85,000,000 




St. Louis County Water Company 


St. Louis 




$ 


25,000,000 




Raytown Water Company 


Raytown 




$ 


3,000,000 




Tri-County Water Company 


Jackson, Cass & Lafayette Cos. $ 


8,365,000 




Middlefork Water Company 


Maryville 




$ 


2,000,000 




SRF Multiple Participant 


various locations 


TOTAL: 


$ 
$ 


48,295,000 
227,895,000 


1993 


Kansas City Power & Light 


Kansas City 




$ 


31,000,000 




Union Electric Company 


St. Louis 




$ 


47,500,000 




Missouri-American Water Company 


St. Joseph 




$ 


5,000,000 




St. Louis County Water Company 


St. Louis 




$ 


15,000,000 




Utilicorp United 


Kansas City 




$ 


5,000,000 




Chrysler Corporation 


St. Louis 




$ 


16,000,000 




Monsanto Company 


St. Louis 


TOTAL: 


$ 
$ 


14,520,000 
134,020,000 


1994 


SRF, Multiple Participant 


Statewide 




$ 


22,425,000 




Union Electric Company 


St. Louis 




$ 


44,000,000 




Kansas City Power & Light 


Kansas City 




$ 


12,366,000 




Associated Electric Co-op 


Springfield 




$ 


27,375,000 




Empire District Electric 


Springfield 




$ 


8,000,000 




Metropolitan Sewer District 


St. Louis 




$ 


50,000,000 




American Cyanamid 


St. Louis 


TOTAL: 


$ 
$ 


3,450,000 
167,616,000 


1995 


SRF, Multiple Participant 


various locations 




$ 


12,215,000 




SRF, Multiple Participant 


various locations 




$ 


43,230,000 




SRF, Multiple Participant 


various locations 




$ 


30,000,000 




SRF, Multiple Participant 


various locations 




$ 


17,450,000 




SRF, Multiple Participant 


various locations 




$ 


11,463,000 




SRF, Multiple Participant 


various locations 




$ 


18,000,000 




St. Joseph Light & Power 


St. Joseph 




$ 


5,600,000 




St. Louis County Water Company 


various locations 




$ 


12,000,000 




St. Joseph Light & Power (refund) 


St. Joseph 


TOTAL: 


$ 
$ 


5,600,000 
155,558,000 


1996 


SRF, Multiple Participant 


various locations 




$ 


26,410,000 




Associated Electric Cooperative 


Springfield 




$ 


127,415,000 




Henry County Water 


Henry County 




$ 


13,000,000 




SRF, Multiple Participant 


various locations 




$ 


4,545,000 




SRF, Multiple Participant 


various locations 




$ 


14,185,000 




SRF, Multiple Participant 


various locations 


TOTAL: 


$ 
$ 


24,000,000 
209,555,000 


1997 


Missouri-American Water Company 


various locations 




$ 


6,000,000 




St. Louis County Water Company 


various locations 




$ 


20,000,000 




SRF, Multiple Participant 


various locations 




$ 


23,600,000 




SRF, Multiple Participant 


various locations 




$ 


24,060,000 




SRF, Multiple Participant 


various locations 




$ 


15,785,000 




SRF, Multiple Participant 


various locations 




$ 


2,500,000 




SRF, Multiple Participant 


various locations 




$ 


22,235,000 




SRF, Multiple Participant 


various locations 




$ 


5,730,000 




Bayer Corporation (refund) 


Kansas City 


TOTAL: 


$ 
$ 


1 ,600,000 
121,510,000 



EXERA 



A nnual R eport 



Project 



Location 



Amount Financed 



1998 


SRF, Multiple Participant 


various locations 




$ 


14,015,000 




Missouri-American Water Company (A) 


various locations 




$ 


4,500,000 




SRF, Multiple Participant 


various locations 




$ 


16,480,000 




St. Louis County Water Company (A) 


various locations 




$ 


25,000,000 








TOTAL: 


$ 


59,995,000 


1999 


AmerenUE(A) 


various locations 




$ 


60,000,000 




AmerenUE(B) 


various locations 




$ 


50,000,000 




AmerenUE(C) 


various locations 




$ 


50,000,000 




Missouri-American Water Company (B) 


various locations 




$ 


19,000,000 




SRF, Multiple Participant 


various locations 




$ 


45,900,000 




SRF, Multiple Participant 


various locations 




$ 


47,970,000 




Raytown Water Company 


Raytown 




$ 


2,670,000 




St. Louis County Water Company 


various locations 




$ 


40,000,000 








TOTAL: 


$ 


315,540,000 


2000 


Tri-County Water Authority 


various locations 




$ 


14,760,000 




SRF, Multiple Participant 


various locations 




$ 


13,870,000 




AmerenUE(A) 


various locations 




$ 


63,500,000 




AmerenUE(B) 


various locations 




$ 


63,000,000 




AmerenUE (C) 


various locations 




$ 


60,000,000 




Missouri-American Water Company 


various locations 




$ 


29,000,000 




SRF, Multiple Participant 


various locations 




$ 


52,640,000 




SRF, MSD-St. Louis (refund) 


various locations 




$ 


72,545,000 








TOTAL: 


$ 


369,315,000 


2001 


SRF, Multiple Participant 


various locations 




$ 


41 ,485,000 




Middlefork Water Company 


various locations 




$ 


1,620,000 




SRF, Multiple Participant 


various locations 




$ 


13,930,000 




orir, iviuiiipie rarTicipani 


various locaxions 






1 ^,UoU,UUU 








TOTAL: 


$ 


179,095,000 


2002 


Missouri Energy Efficiency LL Program 


various locations 




$ 


4,910,000 




Missouri-American Water Company 


various locations 




$ 


15,000,000 




On", IVIUIlipJU r dl UUipdl 11 


VdllOUb lOCaliunS 




<fc 






SRF, Multiple Participant 


various locations 




$ 


112,410,000 








TOTAL: 


$ 


161,865,000 


2003 


Little Blue Valley Sewer District 


Independence 




$ 


88,915,000 




SRF, Multiple Participant 


various locations 




$ 


103,065,000 




SRF, Multiple Participant 


various locations 




$ 


39,940,000 








TOTAL: 


$ 


231,920,000 


2004 


SRF, Multiple Participant (A)(refund) 


various locations 




$ 


77,625,000 




SRF, Multiple Participant (B) 


various locations 




$ 


179,780,000 




SRF, Multiple Participant (C) 


various locations 




$ 


27,895,000 








TOTAL: 


$ 


285,300,000 



various locations 
various locations 
various locations 



TOTAL: 



$ 
$ 
$ 
$ 



13,760,000 
53,060,000 
39,895,000 
106,715,000 



various locations 
various locations 
various locations 



TOTAL: 



$ 14,813,137 

$ 87,505,000 

$ 85,210,000 

$ 187,490,000 



2005 



Missouri Energy Efficiency LL Program 
SRF, Multiple Participant (A) 
SRF, Multiple Participant (C) 



2006 



Missouri Energy Efficiency LL Program 
SRF, Multiple Participant (A) 
SRF, Multiple Participant (C) 



Annual R eport 



Economic De/elopment 



Liberty Wastewater....Goiw 9 to Kansas City.... 



m 



It's not raining in Liberty, 
it's pouring - pouring concrete. 
That concrete is for the new 
$2 million pump station on Raines 
Road in the southeast part of town. 

The pump station has the 
capacity to push 2 million gallons 
of wastewater a day, through 12" 
pipe, to connect with the Kansas 
City system to be treated. The pump 
station is one phase in the city's 
efforts to extend its wastewater 
operation. The city, which is about 
10 miles northeast of Kansas City, 
will close its treatment plant once 
the pump station and gravity sewer 
piping are completed. 

Robert Steinkamp is mayor 
of Liberty, which has more than 
1,200 businesses and a population 
of 29,000 people. "For our city's 
size and needs, economically 
it's better for us to partner with 
Kansas City," the mayor explained. 
Mayor Steinkamp added that an 
engineering company operates the 
waste management facility on a contract basis. 

In fiscal year 2006, Liberty officials received a 
$6.1 million loan from the State Revolving Fund (SRF) 
in Jefferson City. The SRF provides low-cost loans to 
communities and public water districts for improvements 
to wastewater treatment systems and public drinking water 
facilities. 

In addition to the pump station, the financial assistance 
was used to excavate and install pipelines to carry the 
wastewater. David Ross Construction, Lee's Summit, 
built the pump station and employed 12 people at the 
construction site. KAT Excavation, Inc., Bates City, was 
the sewer contractor for the project improvements. KAT 
expects all construction to be completed next year. 




When completed, this $2 million pump station in Liberty will push 2 million gallons of 
wastewater daily to Kansas City to be treated. The pump station was one phase in an 
improvement project assisted by a $6.1 million loan from the State Revolving Fund. 



The SRF, one of the top programs in the nation, 
was established in 1990 by the EIERA, the Department 
of Natural Resources, the Clean Water Commission 
and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. In 
1997, the program was expanded to include drinking 
water and now EIERA works with the Safe Drinking 
Water Commission. Since its inception, more than 
$1.7 billion has been awarded statewide through 
the SRF for public drinking water and wastewater 
improvements. 

"Hundreds of communities across the state have 
received financial assistance through this program," 
said Darwin Hindman, EIERA board member. "By 
opting for the SRF funding rather than conventional 
financing, community leaders have saved citizens more 
than $535 million." 

Annual R eport 




Annual and Cumulative Totals, 1973-2006 



($ Billions) 

6 



□ Cumulative Totals 

□ Annual Figures 



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A nnual R eport 



EIEKA. 



S ummary of B ond I ssuances 



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A nnual R eport 



E conomic D e/elopment 



Brownfields Program Generates Interest Across the State 





"This is one of the most exciting and beneficial 
projects in the state," said Jerry Govero, vice chairman 
of the Authority. "We're providing assistance that will 
help the economic engines create jobs and develop new 
businesses that will foster pride in the community." 



Jim Gulliford, Kansas City 
regional administrator 
for Region VII of the U.S. 
Environmental Protection 
Agency and other officials 
present a $1 million 
"check" to the Missouri 
Environmental Improvement 
and Energy Resources 
Authority for development 
of the first state-operated 
revolving loan fund for clean 
up of Brownfields projects. 
Tom Welch, director, Karen 
Massey, deputy director, 
and Kristin Allan Tipton, 
development director, accept 
the check. 

form to determine eligibility. Once that form is 
recieved, a more detailed application is required 
with plans for cleanup and redevelopment. The 
EIERA works closely with the Department of Natural 
Resources' Brownfields Voluntary Cleanup Program. 



Last year, the Environmental Improvement and 
Energy Resources Authority received a $1 million grant 
from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to 
develop a revolving loan program to assist in the clean 
up and redevelopment of Brownfields sites. In particular, 
staff will focus on small communities in rural and urban 
areas that are contaminated with hazardous or petroleum 
wastes. 

Brownfields are underutilized properties that are 
frequently located on a main road in the center of town. 
Historically, the business community, commercial 
lenders and local officials have hesitated to develop 
these sites because of perceived contamination and other 
environmental issues that may taint the property's value. 

Except for state agencies, any public or private entity 
may be eligible for loans. Staff emphasize that loan 
amounts are flexible under the Brownfields program. 
Staff encourage developers or local officials that are 
interested in the program to submit a pre-application 



Some examples of possible sites are old gasoline 
stations, manufacturing or industrial plants or 
abandoned buildings in blighted areas. EIERA and 
DNR staff confirm that once an area is cleaned up and 
redeveloped, property values increase significantly. 

To obtain an application or project information 
call EIERA at (573) 751-4919 or fax a letter to 
(573) 635-3486. The Authority's address is Post Office 
Box 744, Jefferson City, MO 65102. 



" We 're providing assistance that will 
help the economic engines create jobs 
and develop new businesses that will 
foster pride in the community." 

-Jerry Govero, 
Vice Chairman 
of the Authority 



A nnual R eport 



HERA. 



T heR ede/elopment of B rownfields 



This neighborhood in 
St. Louis, with several 
vacant lots, abandoned 
buildings, an old gasoline 
station and auto repair 
company, was a depressed 
area with numerous 
environmental problems. 
However, through 
investments ($7 million), 
economic development 
incentives and assistance 
from the Missouri 
Department of Natural 
Resources y Brownfields 
Voluntary Cleanup 
Program, this six-acre 
site was dramatically 
transformed. Today, this 
attractive 50, 000-square 
foot shopping center sits 
on that same tract of land 
and annually generates 
approximately $400,000 
in sales tax revenue for 
the city and has created 
more than 70 jobs. 




R estoreB uildings... 




aswell asCommunity P ride 



EIERA 



E 



■nlnl Improvement and fr>dfgy Resources Authano 



State Environmental Improvement and Energy Resources Authority 
Missouri Department of Natural Resources